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The Boys in the Band to premiere on Netflix, Wed. 9/30- Page 7

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Jordan Catalano
Broadway Legend
joined:10/9/05
Broadway Legend
joined:
10/9/05
The way the stage show ended, Bomer walks out the door and then the lights fade on everything except the dimly lit bedroom upstairs where we see the two silhouettes and then it fades to black from there.
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Dancingthrulife2
Broadway Legend
joined:10/28/15
Broadway Legend
joined:
10/28/15

BrodyFosse123 said: "Emory was so loud in the beginning. Every time he laughed it was full mouthed and almost reminiscent of Fran in “The Nanny”. I was thankful for the second half which rounded out his carácter from being a full blown caricature.

I suggest not watchingthe original 1970 film adaptation featuring the entire original 1968 Off-Broadway cast. Greg Gorman’s original Emory makes Robin De Jesus’ Emory in this 2020 version shy and soft-spoken. Even William Friedkin, who directed the 1970 film, regrets not toning down Greg Gorman’s performance for the film as he was still playing it for the last row in the balcony.
"

Did it play at a large off Broadway house?

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Jordan Catalano
Broadway Legend
joined:10/9/05
Broadway Legend
joined:
10/9/05
Not at all. He gave such a nuanced and really, subtle performance it just completely blew me away.
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Wick3
Broadway Legend
joined:8/5/14
Broadway Legend
joined:
8/5/14

BrodyFosse123 said: "Don’t know how this could be confusing to anyone watching the 2020 film. In the extended montage at the end of the film, we clearly see Larry and Hank in the bedroom so when the sex moment is seen in silhouette, the room and it’s occupants has already been clearly established. The last shot of Quinto and Carver is both riding in a taxi cab and Carver resting his head on Quinto’s shoulder.

Anyone confused simply was talking and not paying attention.

The stage version doesn’t include this extended ending so we are aware that Hank and Larry are in the bedroom as we saw them entering it, etc.
"

Not necessarily. I saw it on Broadway so I knew it was Rannells and Watkins making out. However, near the end of the play one of Quinto's last lines was asking Carver whether he is good in bed (and Carver replies he tries to show affection.) 

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henrikegerman
Broadway Legend
joined:4/29/05
Broadway Legend
joined:
4/29/05

I love this.  But it reinforced my one criticism of the revival.  Everyone else is damned near perfect but Quinto takes no joy in Harold's stings and his ponderous delivery slows everything down.  Because there's no zest in him it seems impossible that any of the others would endure him as a friend.  He's not a fun bitch, he's a lifeless one. 

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HogansHero
Broadway Legend
joined:2/26/12
Broadway Legend
joined:
2/26/12

henrikegerman said: "I love this. But it reinforced my one criticism of the revival. Everyone else is damned near perfect but Quinto takes no joy in Harold's stings and his ponderous delivery slows everything down. Because there's no zest in him it seems impossible that any of the others would endure him as a friend. He's not a fun bitch, he's a lifeless one."

I can understand that take, and I am not in love with his performance, but I feel that what he does is totally in keeping with the toxic dysfunctional relationships, especially vis-a-vis Michael. (His last line underscores this, and I take it as both meant and typical.) Note also that Harold has a stingless and non-ponderous relationship with some of the others, exuding genuine affection for, as an example, Emory.